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CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY


AUTOMATED EXTERNAL DEFIBRILLATOR

Chances of survival from sudden cardiac death diminish by 710 percent for each minute without immediate CPR or defibrillation. After 10 minutes, resuscitation rarely succeeds. An AED is an electronic device designed to deliver an electric shock to a victim of sudden cardiac arrest. OSHA does not have standards specific to automated external defibrillators (AEDs). However, exposures to first-aid hazards are addressed in specific standards for the general industry.

 

MEDIC FIRST AID/CARDIO PULMONARY RESUSCITATION CPR
 
ASBESTOS
29 CFR 1926.1101
 
Heavy exposures tend to occur in the construction industry and in ship repair, particularly during the removal of asbestos materials due to renovation, repairs, or demolition. Workers are also likely to be exposed during the manufacture of asbestos products (such as textiles, friction products, insulation, and other building materials) and during automotive brake and clutch repair work.
 
BENZENE
29 CFR 1926.1128
Benzene is a component of products derived from coal and petroleum and is found in gasoline and other fuels. Benzene is used in the manufacture of plastics, detergents, pesticides, and other chemicals. Research has shown benzene to be a carcinogen (cancer-causing). With exposures from less than five years to more than 30 years, individuals have developed, and died from, leukemia. Long-term exposure may affect bone marrow and blood production. Short-term exposure to high levels of benzene can cause drowsiness, dizziness, unconsciousness, and death.
 
BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS
29 CFR 1910.1030
Bloodborne pathogens are infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
 
CLEANING INDUSTRY
As in many industries, employees in the cleaning industry face a number of hazards. Cleaning industry employees may be exposed to potentially hazardous chemicals, may be asked to work with equipment that can present a danger and may be asked to perform various tasks that may cause an injury or illness if not performed properly. Further, the physical environment in which cleaning services are performed can present hazards.
 
CONFINED SPACE
29 CFR 1926.21
The program defines the inherent and induced hazards in confined spaces. Also examines typical confined spaces on construction sites and describes representative hazards within these confined spaces. The content contains a summary of regulations concerning confined spaces in construction.
 
ENTRANT
ATTENDANT
SUPERVISOR
RESCUE
 
CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY
LOCKOUT/TAGOUT
29 CFR 1926.417
"Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)" refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energizing or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities.
 
CRANE, DERRICK, AND HOISTING SAFETY
29 CFR 1926.SUBPART N
Moving large, heavy loads is crucial to today's manufacturing and construction industries. Much technology has been developed for these operations, including careful training and extensive workplace precautions. There are significant safety issues to be considered, both for the operators of the diverse "lifting" devices, and for workers in proximity to them.
 
NCCER
29 CFR 1926.403
Electrical contractors are responsible for the health and safety of employees who are exposed to a variety of hazards. Some of these hazards are obvious, such as electrical shock and electrocution. Others, such as musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), back injuries, slips and falls, or automobile-related incidents may not be as obvious. The occurrence of these injuries is increasing as the scope of work performed by the typical electrical contractor and the age of the work population increases. While much of their work is still concentrated in construction, they may also perform building maintenance or installation of data and networking applications.
 
EXCAVATION
29 CFR 1926.650
Excavating is recognized as one of the most hazardous construction operations. OSHA revised Subpart P, Excavations, of 29 CFR 1926.650, 29 CFR 1926.651, and 29 CFR 1926.652 to make the standard easier to understand, permit the use of performance criteria where possible, and provide construction employers with options when classifying soil and selecting employee protection methods.
 
COMPACTOR MINI
DRAGLINE
BUCKET WHEEL
EXCAVATOR
 
FALL PROTECTION
1926 SUBPART M
The US Department of Labor (DOL) lists falls as one of the leading causes of traumatic occupational death, accounting for eight percent of all occupational fatalities from trauma. Any time a worker is at a height of four feet or more, the worker is at risk and needs to be protected. Fall protection must be provided at four feet in general industry, five feet in maritime and six feet in construction. However, regardless of the fall distance, fall protection must be provided when working over dangerous equipment and machinery.
 
POWERED INDUSTRIAL
FORKLIFT
29.CFR 1910.178

Each year, tens of thousands of injuries related to powered industrial trucks (PIT), or forklifts, occur in US workplaces. Many employees are injured when lift trucks are inadvertently driven off loading docks, lifts fall between docks and an unsecured trailer, they are struck by a lift truck, or when they fall while on elevated pallets and tines. Most incidents also involve property damage, including damage to overhead sprinklers, racking, pipes, walls, and machinery. Unfortunately, most employee injuries and property damage can be attributed to lack of safe operating procedures, lack of safety-rule enforcement, and insufficient or inadequate training.

It is a violation of Federal law for anyone UNDER 18 years of age to operate a forklift or for anyone OVER 18 years of age who is not properly trained and certified to do so.

FORKLIFT SMOOTH SURFACE & ALL TERRAIN
BATTERY
DIESEL
GAS
LPG
LIFTING BOOMS
LIFTING MAGNET
LIFTING SPREADER BARS
 
HAND TOOLS
29 CFR 1926.301
Hand and power tools are a common part of our everyday lives and are present in nearly every industry. These tools help us to easily perform tasks that otherwise would be difficult or impossible. However, these simple tools can be hazardous and have the potential for causing severe injuries when used or maintained improperly. Special attention toward hand and power tool safety is necessary in order to reduce or eliminate these hazards. Hand and power tool hazards are addressed in specific standards for the general industry, shipyard employment, marine terminals, longshoring, and the construction industry.
 
SCAFFOLDS
29 CFR 1926.453
In a Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) study, 72% of workers injured in scaffold accidents attributed the accident either to the planking or support giving way, or to the employee slipping or being struck by a falling object. Scaffolding is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, shipyard employment, marine terminals, and longshoring.
 
AERIAL LIFTS
AERIAL LADDERS
SCISSOR LIFTS
 
SAFELAND/SAFEGULF
SafeLand USA is a volunteer organization comprised of major and independent operating companies, industry associations, and educators with the purpose of developing a standardized orientation which sets minimum requirements for the US Onshore E&P Industry.
 
TRENCHING & EXCAVATION
Excavating is recognized as one of the most hazardous construction operations. OSHA revised Subpart P, Excavations, of 29 CFR 1926.650, 29 CFR 1926.651, and 29 CFR 1926.652 to make the standard easier to understand, permit the use of performance criteria where possible, and provide construction employers with options when classifying soil and selecting employee protection methods. Trenching and excavation hazards are addressed in specific standards for the general industry and marine terminals.
 
RIGGING
This section applies to slings used in conjunction with other material handling equipment for the movement of material by hoisting, in employments covered by this part. The types of slings covered are those made from alloy steel chain, wire rope, metal mesh, natural or synthetic fiber rope (conventional three strand construction), and synthetic web (nylon, polyester, and polypropylene).
 

 

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